The Weblog

This page contains news, event information, and other items added by the market managers. This is where you will find old newsletters, plus info not included in your weekly newsletter, plus the past year’s weekly newsletters. 10 pages at a time are visible. You may choose to go back further at the bottom of this page.
Thank you for your interest.

“Thanks to all who make this possible!!” ~
DM, Greenville SC
“I’m really happy with everything I received. How juicy and tasty
I’m so thankful for reliable growers and market.” ~ MC, Greenville SC

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Important Bills in Senate Now would make more Locally Processed Foods Available


Hello Folks.
News via South Carolina Association of Farmer’s Market Board:
There are 2 bills in the SC 119th session right now that address processing food in private homes. From the Senate its Bill number “S1035” and has been referred to the Medical Affairs Committee. From the House, the Bill’s number is “H 4689” and has been referred to Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs. Both bills have only been in the process under 2 months and have only been ‘read’ once. Now is the time to contact our state senators and reps. and urge them to vote in favor of these bills!
After a little research, I think home bakers had a lot to do with bringing this about. The bills also mention processing low acid canned goods. This is awesome news!!! Lets all spread the word!
“Go to”: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/index.php you will find links to your state legislators. Urge them to support and vote “yes” on these bills! You can even send a message to the committees.
Maybe we could draft a letter from the SCAFM letting them know how important this issue is to the many farmers markets across the state.

Harvest News: The Winter Garden Issue


Upstate Locally Grown Market
www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Director
Donna Putney

EDITOR
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD Market Manager:

Courtney Rebovich
Packing Coordinator: Shae Smith
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Smoked Boston Butt

7 pounds fresh pork butt roast
2 tablespoons chili powder
1/4 tsp red pepper
1/2 tsp cumin
4 tablespoons packed brown sugar
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:
If desired, soak the pork butt in a brine solution for at least 4 hours or overnight. You should do this covered and in the refrigerator.
Preheat an outdoor smoker for 200 to 225 degrees F (95 to 110 degrees C).
In a small bowl, combine the brown sugar, chili powder and any additional seasonings to your taste. Apply this liberally to the meat and rub it in with your fingers. Place a roasting rack in a drip pan and lay the meat on the rack.
Smoke at 200 to 225 degrees for 6 to 18 hours, or until internal pork temperature reaches 160 degrees F.

Pull off and serve with cornbread.

Market News


Featured and Fresh Products to Look for this Week:
Boston Butt
Mild Sausage
Sweet Carolina Onions
Turnip Tops
Green Garlic
Thyme
Rosemary
Sourdough
Raw Milk
Cookies
Muffins
Scones
Pound Cake
Plants: cabbage, strawberries, collards,
Seeds: carrots, snow peas
Compost

… plus all your favorite Putney Farm eggs, Happy Cow milk products, and much, much more!

IMPORTANT USLG UPDATES
Save The Date Our Second Annual Seed Swap will be held Saturday, February 25, 2012 at the Honea Path home of Helen and Rob Daugherty, owners of Happy Critters Ranch. Rob and Helen willl be serving up breakfast biscuits of pork from the farm. More details to follow, but please save this date. We always have a fine time at these get-togethers, and we exchange a whole lot of info from al the gardeners (and wannabe gardeners!) gathering in one place.

  • Plant Sale* Date TBA: At the home of Donna and Lenard Putney, owners of Putney Farm eggs. A plant swap, to coincide with safe dates for planting starts and plants. Whether you are a seasoned Master gardener or just beginning; whether you have a full-fledged farm, an urban plot, or a balcony with flower pots, you will glean priceless info and meet some great folks to hang out with.

In Transition: Remember to continue to draw down your balances to zero, and pay-as-you-go for a time. USLG is balancing its books for year-end taxes.

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Your Egg Cartons With USLG!
Reduce greenhouse gases and save a trip to the recycling can by throwing your CLEAN Putney Farm cardboard or PET egg cartons back in your reusable grocery bag when they have been emptied out, and bring them to drop-off next time. We can reuse these for your future egg purchases. Thanks!

Prayer Request
Please keep Donna and her wonderful husband, Lenard, in your prayers as they struggle through some health issues. We need your support and helping hands to carry us through this rough spot.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and good family meals from all your goodies! Donna and Lenard, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

My Winter Garden


Guest Blogger: Lloyd E. Willis, PhD
Dr. Willis, who is a supporter of our Greenwood Locally Grown branch and an English professor at Lander University, has authored two books, one on environmental issues. USLG is pleased to be able to feature his writing in the Harvest News!

If it is warmer than 60 degrees outside, I want to be working in a garden. Thus, the weather this January has been hard on me. Every ounce of my being has demanded that I plant something, but, thankfully, I have resisted. What I have accomplished, however, is a great deal of reading, planning, and preparing.

Every leaf that fell on my half-acre lot in the Fall has been collected in a series of compost heaps, one of which is getting special treatment—it’s getting all our kitchen scraps, an occasional batch of Donna Putney’s composted chicken manure, and constant turning. For me, composting is an especially urgent issue this year because my family moved to a new house over the summer and we will have to build an entirely new garden in a backyard that seems to have never produced a thing other than daffodils and mosquitoes. Oh, how I miss that old garden in the previous subdivision, which I built out of nothing but packed clay on that little lot that was almost wholly devoid of topsoil, trees and their leaves, and anything else that could be composted for the enrichment of our harvest.

One of my major realizations over the past several years is that one cannot really have an organic garden without a steady supply of organic manure. So, during this unseasonably warm winter I have constructed a hutch and procured rabbits—all girls named Snowy, Joe, and Dark Sky—and instructed them to manufacture all the manure they can muster, as quickly as possible.

More than anything, perhaps, I have tried to track what my family eats the most and figure out how I can produce more of those staples in our back yard. So far, this is what I think we need in the garden this summer. In mass quantities (enough to store for the winter):

  • Potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Herbs—basil, parsley, cilantro, thyme, rosemary
  • Summer squash of all varieties
  • Carrots
  • Black beans
  • In smaller amounts (things we’ll want to eat as they go but not preserve)
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers (I’ve made some great pickles in the past, but I predict that I’ll lack that patience this year)
  • Sweet peas (I’d love to grow enough to freeze, but, considering my kids and their appetite for these things, I think it would be virtually impossible to produce enough.)
  • Various lettuces, spinaches, and other leafy things

My planning is driven by what we eat the most, but it is also driven by how easy (or how hard) it is to procure the things we want. Tomatoes are a perfect example. First of all, I will confess—and I know it marks me as an oddball—I don’t like raw tomatoes. Cook them any which way and you will have to fight me off, but please do not ask me to eat a raw tomato. And cook them I do—all the time. I love the challenge of making good marinara (and if I had to choose one cuisine to eat the rest of my life it would be Italian); I love chili, which requires a tomato base; I am about to embark on a homemade ketchup experiment.

I require a lot of tomatoes, and I have always loved the convenience and generally high quality of canned tomato product. One can even buy Muir Glen organic canned tomatoes in the Greenwood, SC Walmart, Sadly, however, those easy canned tomatoes are almost all packed in BPA-lined cans, and my family went BPA-free about three years ago (or so we thought).

This summer, if everything goes according to plan, I’ll stuff the pantry with a year’s supply of jarred tomatoes that I grew in the back yard with the help of my wife, my kids, and, of course, my rabbits.

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible!

Market is open for ordering


Your Upstate Locally Grown market is now open for ordering, and the Harvest news will follow. It looks to be a good Harvest News with an article on Winter Gardens by Lloyd Willis, Phd.
Speaking of gardening, we just set the date for our 2nd annual seed swap for Feb 25. It will be at Happy Critters Ranch, Honea Path, SC, and Rob and Helen willl be serving up breakfast biscuits of pork from the farm. More details to follow, but, please save this date. We always have a fine time at these get-togethers, as well as exchange a whole lot of info from al the gardeners gathering in one place.
Later, exact date TBA, we will have a plant sale and swap at the Putney’s place. This one will coincide with safe dates to plant out your starts and plants. Whether you are a seasoned Master gardener, or just beginning; whether you have a full-fledged farm, an urban plot, or a balcony with flower pots, you will glean priceless info and meet some great folks to hang out with.
The link to USLG’s site is www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net, or click here

Quick Reminder to order for drop-off on Tuesday or Wednesday


Floks, sorry for the extra emails, however, many of you have told me that you need these reminders over the weekend as a memory jogger.
Hope you are enjoying your weekend as much as I am…..Finally got to get out there and plant!!!! Yeay!!!
Happy Shopping and Healthy eating! :-)
?
Donna
here’s the link: www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net
{If you have any trouble getting into your account, I will be very happy to send you your log-in info, or you can click on “Forgot my password or account name”, type in your email, and you will receive your log-in info and a new pasword from USLG software. After that, you can change your password at any time to suit yuolurself, but yur account name will always be the same.}

Harvest News: Thursday, Jan. 25-Monday, Jan. 29


Upstate Locally Grown Market
www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Director
Donna Putney

EDITOR
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD Market Manager:

Courtney Rebovich
Packing Coordinator: Shae Smith
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Crock Pot Falafel
Gluten Free!

- 8 ounces dried chick peas (garbanzo beans), or half a bag.
- 1/2 onion, chopped
-1 T dried parsley
- 2 cloves minced garlic
- 1 Putney Farm egg*
- 1 t kosher salt
- 1/4 t black pepper
- 2 t ground cumin
- 1 t ground coriander
- 1/4 t cayenne pepper
- juice from 1 lemon
- 1/2 to 3/4 cup bread crumbs (Panko or homemade)
- 2 T olive oil (for the bottom of your crockpot)
- Split Creek yogurt*

Method:
Quick soak beans by boiling for a minute and then allowing to sit for 1 hour or soak overnight.

Drain and rinse beans. And cook until tender and skins slid off easily, about 1.5 hours.

(Or, this recipe works with a 15-ounce can of rinsed and drained chickpeas).

Dump chickpeas them into a mixing bowl and smash with a fork. Set aside.

Using a blender, food processor or hand mixer, blend together all of the spices, the onion, the garlic, the egg, and the lemon juice.

Pour on top of your smashed garbanzo beans. Use your fork to mix together, and add the breadcrumbs slowly until the mixture is wet and sticky but can be formed into balls nicely.

Pour 2 T of olive oil into the bottom of your crockpot.

Form golf-ball sized patties of falafel and then carefully squish flat (but not too flat or they will crumble!). Dip each side into the olive oil and then nestle into your crockpot. It’s okay if they overlap or are on top of each other.

Cook on high for 2-5 hours. You will know that the falafels are done when they turn brownish-golden. You can flip them halfway through the cooking time but this is not necessary.

Serve with Split Creek lemon yogurt, sprinkled with dill and celery seed, or Greek yogurt mixed with celery seed, dill, salt and pepper and lemon juice.

Serve on corn tortillas with lettuce, tomato, and the yogurt sauce. This is enough food for a family of four.

  • These products can currently be found fresh on the Market page at USLG




Market News



Featured and Fresh Products to Look for this Week:
Greens
Fresh Herbs
Baked Goods galore
Beef
Pork chops
Pork sausage
Scallions
Carolina Sweet Onions
Spinach, lettuce, and beet greens
Rutabaga
… plus all your favorite Putney Farm eggs, Happy Cow milk products, and much, much more!

IMPORTANT USLG UPDATES
In Transition: Remember to continue to draw down your balances to zero, and pay-as-you-go for a time. USLG is on the move, with many good changes ahead of us.

NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION! SWAMP RABBIT CAFE AND GROCERY, Cedar Lane, Greenville, will be our newest drop-off location for USLG’ers near Traveler’s rest or Downtown Greenville: located along the Swamp Rabbit Bike trail!

New Year, New Opportunities for Potential MARKET HELPERS!
It takes a villiage to make a food system work, you know! We have need for:
- Extra hands at drop off
- Tuesday order packers
- Writers to contribute to Harvest News
- Facebook/Twitter page administrators
- Web helpers (to work on the back end of the site managing weekly orders)
Whether you have an hour a month, a couple of hours a week, or a few extra minutes at drop-off, there are so many ways that we could use your unique talents to benefit local farms, artisans, and families. To see if you might fit into a slot, please email (click here:) Donna at putneyfarm@aol.com

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Your Egg Cartons With USLG!
Reduce greenhouse gases and save a trip to the recycling can by throwing your CLEAN Putney Farm cardboard or PET egg cartons back in your reusable grocery bag when they have been emptied out, and bring them to drop-off next time. We can reuse these for your future egg purchases. Thanks!

Prayer Request
Please keep Donna and her wonderful husband, Lenard, in your prayers as they struggle through some health issues. We need your support and helping hands to carry us through this rough spot.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and good family meals from all your goodies! Donna and Lenard, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Why I Eat Local


Guest Blogger: Lloyd E. Willis, PhD
Dr. Willis, who is a supporter of our Greenwood Locally Grown branch and an English professor at Lander University, has authored two books, one on environmental issues. USLG is thrilled to be able to start featuring his writing in the Harvest News!

Where does environmentalism stand today?

For a number of years I studied the history of environmentalism as an academic subject, and the longer I pursued that goal I found it more difficult to understand the environmentalism of the current moment. Today, it is still hard to determine where things stand. It’s now possible to find organic products in Walmart and most any chain grocery store; some studies show that the United States consumes less gasoline now than it did in 2008; and we all now use cfl lightbulbs, like ’em or not.

But I can never determine if I should see these things as progress or greenwashing that makes us feel just environmentally friendly enough to justify deferring wholesale changes in our daily lives.

The same situation exists on the pollution front: It’s been a while since a river caught on fire in the United States, and it’s now been 23 years since the Exxon Valdez coated Prince William Sound in crude oil, but in the past two years the Deepwater Horizon dwarfed the Exxon Valdez disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and we all bore witness to the world’s greatest peacetime nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan. What environmental catastrophes have lost in frequency they have gained back in scale.

I have gone swimming in the Gulf of Mexico, and I have seen many a Florida sunset sink beneath its waters; when the Deepwater Horizon was pumping hundreds of thousands of crude oil into it and Louisiana’s estuaries, I could feel the damage in my soul, but Prince William Sound and Fukushima, Japan are complete abstractions. I understand them as I might understand a Chemistry textbook, but I don’t feel the loss of those environmental travesties.

I applaud those who can think and act globally (thank you, Al Gore) but to truly believe the world can change I have to narrow my focus—like to the food I put in my mouth. For my money, food is the most powerful factor in environmentalism today. The plate and the fork are the unavoidable instruments that maintain our now largely invisible link to the nonhuman world of soil, sun, and water, and the plate and fork bind us all together. Despite differing religions, political points of view, and economic statuses, we all eat. This may be the last thing we all have in common. And today what we put on our plates can be genetically engineered, synthetic, raised by exploited laborers, fertilized with chemicals, sprayed with poisons, and shipped from Argentina or New Zealand. Or it can be organic and local; produced by expert farmers and artisans; and completely wholesome. Each of us gets to decide what we eat, and the decisions we make reverberate into all the larger issues: food miles, national farm policies, fundamental issues about land use, the value and danger of GMO’s, the basic relationship we want to forge with the world around us.

As basic as they are, eating and participating in an economy are always political actions. I thank God that Upstate Locally Grown gives me the opportunity to both eat and buy in ways that allow me to remain true to the values of responsibility and sustainability that I privilege above almost anything else.

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible!

Order Now for USLG This Week.


Hello my friends.
The ordering window is quickly coming to a close for this week, and I see that many of you who usually (faithfully) order haven’t yet this week. So, just a quick reminder, in case anyone has gotten caught up in a wonderful weekend and lost track of the USLG timeline. We want to give you the opportunity to take advantage of the delicious, crispy fresh produce, baked goods, dairy, eggs, and health and beauty products which are being grown for our market and you. Many, (though not all) of our products are pretty much exclusive to Locally Grown.net members and not available anywhere else, or else have a very limited availability at stores who specialize in local foods.
Your ordering habits will determine our future decisions about how USLG products are offered, how often, and by whom. Your purchases go toward operating this market without any outside support (besides Putney Farm and our Market helpers. You are the ones who vote, with your food dollars, whether our efforts are going in the right direction. If you like what we are doing and want us to continue in the same vein, let us know by choosing USLG as your local food source.
We have had some excellent responses to our call for market helpers, and we thank you so much for your enthusiasm. We have some of the teams almost complets, and might have room for your special talents and winning smile. Please hit “reply” on your email if you would like to know more, and add “market Helper” to the subject line.
Thank you for your prayers and good thoughts as Lenard and I face health challenges and life changes.
Market will close at 9 on Monday morning. Happy shopping and hjealthy eating! :0) ?,
Donna to go to USLG click here putneyfarm@aol.com 864-901-2692 Feel free to contact me at any time before 8 pm by phone, and any day but Tuesday and Wednesday by email.

Harvest News: Thursday, Jan. 19-Monday, Jan. 23


Upstate Locally Grown Market
www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Director
Donna Putney

EDITOR
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD Market Manager:

Courtney Rebovich
Packing Coordinator: Shae Smith
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Ina Garten’s Pan-Fried Onion Dip
Localized for USLG

4-6 large Carolina sweet onions
4 Tablespoons unsalted Happy Cow butter
¼ cup organic vegetable oil
¼ teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 ounces Happy Cow cream cheese, room temperature
½ cup Happy Cow sour cream
½ Duke’s mayonnaise

Cut the onion in half and then slice them into 1/8-inch thick half rounds. (You will have about 3 cups)
Heat butter and oil in large saute pan on medium heat. Add onions, cayenne, salt, and pepper and saute for 10 minutes. Continue cooking until onions are browned and caramelized. Allow the onion to cool.

Place the cream cheese, sour cream, and mayo in bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment and beat until smooth. Add the oinion and mix well. Taste for seasonings.

  • These products can currently be found fresh on the Market page at USLG




Market News



Featured and Fresh Products to Look for this Week:
Greens
Fresh Herbs
Baked Goods galore
Beef
Pork chops
Pork sausage
Scallions
Carolina Sweet Onions
Spinach, lettuce, and beet greens
Rutabaga
… plus all your favorite Putney Farm eggs, Happy Cow milk products, and much, much more!

IMPORTANT USLG UPDATES
In Transition: Remember to continue to draw down your balances to zero, and pay-as-you-go for a time. USLG is on the move, with many good changes ahead of us.

NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION! SWAMP RABBIT CAFE AND GROCERY, Cedar Lane, Greenville, will be our newest drop-off location for USLG’ers near Traveler’s rest or Downtown Greenville: located along the Swamp Rabbit Bike trail!

New Year, New Opportunities for Potential MARKET HELPERS!
It takes a villiage to make a food system work, you know! We have need for:
- Extra hands at drop off
- Tuesday order packers
- Writers to contribute to Harvest News
- Facebook/Twitter page administrators
- Web helpers (to work on the back end of the site managing weekly orders)
Whether you have an hour a month, a couple of hours a week, or a few extra minutes at drop-off, there are so many ways that we could use your unique talents to benefit local farms, artisans, and families. To see if you might fit into a slot, please email (click here:) Donna at putneyfarm@aol.com

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Your Egg Cartons With USLG!
Reduce greenhouse gases and save a trip to the recycling can by throwing your CLEAN Putney Farm cardboard or PET egg cartons back in your reusable grocery bag when they have been emptied out, and bring them to drop-off next time. We can reuse these for your future egg purchases. Thanks!

Prayer Request
Please keep Donna and her wonderful husband, Lenard, in your prayers as they struggle through some health issues. We need your support and helping hands to carry us through this rough spot.

Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and good family meals from all your goodies! Donna and Lenard, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Food News You Can Use


A primer on GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) courtesy of the Non-GMO Shopping Guide, a project of the Non GMO Project, The Institute for Responsible Technology, and Voice of the Environment. Please click through to these links for more detailed and incredibly informative writeups.

WHAT IS A GMO?
A genetically modified organism is a man-made, patented, organism created in a laboratory through genetic engineering. It is created when a gene from a totally unrelated species is shot into the genetic material of another species. Scientists worldwide now admit that the rush to sell genetically engineered product has put people’s health, property and the environment at risk.

HASN’T RESEARCH SHOWN GM FOODS TO BE SAFE?
No. The only feeding study done with humans showed that GMOs survived inside the stomach of the people eating GMO food. No follow-up studies were done. Various feeding studies in animals have resulted in potentially pre-cancerous cell growth, damaged immune systems, smaller brains, livers, and testicles, partial atrophy or increased density of the liver, odd shaped cell nuclei and other unexplained anomalies, false pregnancies and higher death rates.

WHAT INDICATIONS ARE THERE THAT GMs ARE CAUSING A PROBLEM?
Soon after GM soy was introduced to the UK, soy allergies skyrocketed by 50 percent. In March 2001, the Center for Disease Control reported that food is responsible for twice the number of illnesses in the U.S. compared to estimates just seven years earlier. This increase roughly corresponds to the period when Americans have been eating GM food. Without follow-up tests, which neither the industry or government are doing, we can’t be absolutely sure if genetic engineering was the cause.

GMs COULD BE CONTRIBUTING TO ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE?
Yup. The techniques used to transfer genes have a very low success rate, so the genetic engineers attach “marker genes” that are resistant to antibiotics to help them to find out which cells have taken up the new DNA. That way, scientists can then douse the experimental GMO in antibiotics and if it lives, they have successfully altered the genes. The marker genes are resistant to antibiotics that are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine. Some scientists believe that eating GE (genetically engineered) food containing these marker genes could encourage gut bacteria to develop antibiotic resistance.

TIPS TO AVOID GMOs:
Although most Americans say they would avoid brands if labeled GMO, unfortunately labels are not required. Here are tips to help you shop non-GMO.
Tip #1: Buy Organic
Certified organic products cannot intentionally include any GMO ingredients. Buy products labeled “100% organic,” “organic,” or “made with organic ingredients.” You can be doubly sure if the product also has a Non-GMO Project Verified Seal.
Tip #2: Look for Non-GMO Project Seals
Products that carry the Non-GMO Project Seal are independently verified to be in compliance with North America’s only third party standard for GMO avoidance, including testing of at-risk ingredients.
The Non-GMO Project is a non-profit organization
committed to providing consumers with clearly labeled and independently verified non-GMO choices.
Tip #3: Avoid at-risk ingredients
If it’s not labeled organic or verified non-GMO: Avoid products made with ingredients that might be derived from GMOs. The eight GM food crops are Corn, Soybeans, Canola, Cottonseed, Sugar Beets, Hawaiian Papaya (most) and a small amount of Zucchini and Yellow Squash.
Sugar: If a non-organic product made in North American lists “sugar” as an ingredient (and NOT pure cane sugar), then it is almost certainly a combination of sugar from both sugar cane and GM sugar beets.
Dairy: Products may be from cows injected with GM bovine growth hormone. Look for labels stating No rBGH, rBST, or artificial hormones, or check brand listings at NonGMOShoppingGuide.com

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible!

Harvest News 1/12/12


Upstate Locally Grown Market
www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Director
Donna Putney

EDITOR
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD Market Manager:

Courtney Rebovich
Packing Coordinator: Shae Smith
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Vegetable Beef Soup
Great for a crowd or freezes well. Serves 8-10

3 medium *onions, chopped
1 ½ lb. lean ground *Nature’s Beef
2 T extra-virgin Olive Oil
4 cups beef broth
6-8 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 beef bouillon cube or packet
5 (14.5 oz.) cans diced tomatoes
2 c. *carrots, chopped
1 ½ cups celery, sliced
3 c. potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 c. frozen cut green beans
1 ½ c. frozen niblet corn
2-3 T *parsley flakes
3 tsp dried basil
2 tsp. dried *thyme
1 T. salt, or to taste
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper, or to taste.

Brown onions and beef in oil using 12-quart soup pot. Add all remaining ingredients,
simmer 1 ½ hours.

  • These products can currently be found fresh on the Market page at USLG




Market News


MARKET NEWS


Hello Folks!
Upstate Locally Grown is made for folks like you, who believe in pulling together for the cause of local food and local business.

  • In Transition: Remember to draw down your balances to zero, and pay-as-you-go for a time. USLG is on the move, with many good changes ahead of us.

We are so glad that you are fans of our local growers! And we are thankful that you choose us as your local food system! We select our “growers” very carefully before we approve them to sell on our market. Growers must meet certain standards to be Upstate Locally Grown Approved.
Produce:
Upstate Locally Grown Approved produce growers are folks who have the cooperative spirit and the integrity to use organic methods, no matter how hard it is. Their (our) farms are visited by our peers so we know the growing methods of each grower. The growers come highly reccomended by their peers and by our memmbers. Every produce grower uses sustainable “beyond organic” methods We pick your veggies just hours before you get them. Where else can you get veggies delivered to you any fresher or more pure? You can feel good about feeding your family USLG selected produce, as we stand behind that promise with a guarantee that if you are dissatisfied, we will gladly credit your account, or else replace the item for you.
*Processed and Baked Goods: *
Our folks who process your foods use the freshest and most pure ingredients possible. Your products are prepared to order, meaning that they are just hours old when you get them. Using the freshest ingredients possible and using no preservatives makes USLG baked goods better for you than conventional.
Not all of the ingredients are organic in baked goods, so they are considered conventional but without preservatives.

Meats:
Every meat grower on this site allows their animals to free range. When supplemented with feed, the feed has no antibiotics, and no horomones are used. We don’t routinely use any antibiotics at all.
So, we hope that this information will help you to feel good about the food you order through us.
Welcome to new growers: Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery!!!! Mary and Jac will be offering up some scrumptious bakery items fresh from the oven to you! Look under “New Products” and you can order directly from there, or else go to “Baked Goods” and see all of our luscious mouth-watering baked goods (pies, breads, cakes, rolls) from Swamp rabbit Cafe and our other very tralented bakers.

NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION!
SWAMP RABBIT CAFE AND GROCERY, Cedar Lane, Greenville, will be our newest drop-off location for USLG’ers near Traveler’s rest or Downtown Greenville: along the Swamp Rabbit Bike trail!

New Year, New opportunities for potential MARKET HELPERS! (It takes a villiage to make a food system work, you know)
Upstate Locally Grown is a market in transition and on the grow! You may be the special person who will help to transition us into a successful 2012! The wonderful part is that we have divided up the tasks so that a busy person like you might still be able to fit US Locally Grown into your busy schedule. (And some can be done while picking up your order anyway!) :0)
Do you long to write? Would you like to contribute articles, recipes, or photos to the weekly Harvest News weblog? (Get in on the good stuff before anyone else knows). Click here and reply to “Harvest News Opportunity”-
Be an administrator on our Facebook page/ build our fan following on Facebook/Twitter/Etc.
- work on website; such as: adjust cheese prices for your drop-off, edit market page, upload photos, add recipes, etc.
And other areas. Whether you have an hour a month, or a couple of hours a week, there are so many ways that we could use your unique talents to benefit local farms, artisans, and families.
To see if you might fit into a slot, please email (click here:) Donna at putneyfarm@aol.com

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Your Egg Cartons With USLG!
Reduce greenhouse gases and save a trip to the recycling can by throwing your CLEAN Putney Farm cardboard or PET egg cartons back in your reusable grocery bag when they have been emptied out, and bring them to drop-off next time. We can reuse these for your future egg purchases. Thanks!

Prayer Request
Please keep Donna and her wonderful husband, Lenard, in your prayers as they struggle through some health issues. We need your support and helping hands to carry us through this rough spot.

Featured and Fresh Products to Look for this Week:
Greens
Fresh Herbs
Baked Goods galore
Beef
Pork chops
Pork sausage
Scallions
Spinach, lettuce, and beet greens
Broccoli
Rutabaga
and much, much more!

Make Your Own Bath and Beauty Products
Hair Spray, Lotion, soap, lip balm, and more are easy to make with ingredients from your garden and/or Upstate Locally Grown. A great primer from Natural Home & Garden magazine gives you the basics.
Or, try making this simple hairspray recipe contributed by our local expert on these things: Courtney Rebovich! We love ya, Court!
Hair Spray Recipe
1/2 cup nearly boiling water
3 TBS sugar (yes, sugar)(more for coarse hair, less for fine hair)
a splash of vodka for preservative (in the hair spray, silly)
a drop or two of essential oil (Courtney used lime, but you can choose rosemary or lavender; anything)(or go fragrance free)
mix together till sugar is dissolved, put into a bottle with a fine mist pump spray. Spray once, and if you need more, wait at least 30 seconds to re-apply so the first layer can dry a little. (the alcohol in the vodka helps here, too.)
I thought Courtney’s hair looked pretty good when I saw her yesterday, so I reccomend it!
Have a wonderful week, happy shopping on USLG, and good family meals from all your goodies!
Donna and Lenard, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

USLG Events & Updates


A few of us have just discovered WinterSown, which tells you how to sow seeds now and have them come up at just the right time this spring. I’m trying it to see how it works in our area, and thought some of you might want to give it a whirl. I figured you might be like me; going ionto withdrawals from not being able to play wioth the dirt and make thigs grow. Try this link or go to www.wintersown.org. You can even get or give free seeds! :0)


We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible!

A reminder for those who haven't ordered yet


Hello folks. If you would like to get an order in for this week, here’s a heads-up, so you won’t miss out on the delicious veggies that we have on the market for you.
This year, we have some items that we have never been able to offer before; such as whole heads of cabbage, and turnips, turnip greens, and various delicious winter squashes. Several lettuces are available, and baby beet greens, too. If you are a root vegetrable fan, there are Sweet potatoes and beets, both of which store very well. Onions are available, and it is a good idea to stock up, because many of these veggies aren’t available in the spring or summer, so, we need to store them if we want good, sustainably raised, local food that, even if stored, are bound to be thousands of miles fresher and in much better condition than those which have to be shipped in.
Thanks for your support of Upstate Locally Grown. We send love to all!
Donna and Lenard Putney and all the growers.

Harvest News for Jan 5th 2012


Upstate Locally Grown Market
www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Director
Donna Putney

EDITOR
Heidi Williams
GREENWOOOD Market Manager:

Courtney Rebovich
Packing Coordinator: Shae Smith
DROP_OFF SCHEDULE

Recipes


Winter Root Vegetable Slaw
In the winter months, we tend to forget to eat fresh veggies. here is a recipe that will help us get more of the vitamin C that we are missing this season.

The choice of root vegetables here works well, but you are free to mix and match. Just be sure to not have too many sweet vegetables like carrots and parsnips, or too many sharp ones, like radishes or turnips.

Ingredients
•1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
•1 teaspoon salt
•1 teaspoon sugar
•1/4 cup sherry or red wine vinegar
•1 cup chopped parsley*, loosely packed
•2/3 cup olive oil
•2 large carrots* (choose different colored carrots if you can find them)
•2 medium parsnips
•1 small celery root
•2 black radishes* or 1/2 daikon radish

  • Those marked with an asterisk can be found on USLG’s Market page.

Method

1 Put the mustard, salt, sugar, vinegar and parsley in a blender and process until combined, about 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the blender, cover and process at its slowest setting. Drizzle in the olive oil slowly. When it is all in, move the blender to its highest setting and puree for about 90 seconds.

2 Peel all the vegetables except for the radishes, if you are using black ones. The slivers of black in the salad look cool, so I leave them in. Using a vegetable peeler or a coarse grater, slice shreds off the vegetables into a bowl. Try to keep the shreds roughly the same length if you can.

3 To finish, toss some of the vinaigrette with the shredded vegetables and let stand in the fridge for at least 20 minutes before serving.

Yield: Serves 4-6 as a side dish

Market News




WELCOME BACK! WE HAVE MANY NEW ITEMS FOR YOU! (AND A NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION, TOO!)
Welcome to new growers: Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery!!!! Mary and Jac will be offering up some scrumptious bakery items fresh from the oven to you! Also, They will be our new drop-off location for USLG’ers near Traveler’s rest or Downtown Greenville: anywhere along the Swamp Rabbit Bike trail!
New Year, New opportunities for MARKET HELPERS!
Upstate Locally Grown is a market in transition! And you may be the special person who will help to transition us into a successful 2012! The wonderful part is that we have divide up the tasks so that a busy person might still be able to fit US Locally Grown into their busy schedule. And some can be done while picking up your order anyway! :0)
We have grown so much, and are beginning to establish teams of special market helpers to:
Contribute articles, recipes, or photos to the weekly Harvest News weblog. (Get in on the good stuff before anyone else knows). Click here and reply to “Harvest News Opportunity”-
Be an administrator on our Facebook page/ build our fan following on Facebook/Twitter/Etc.
- Answer questions from new members.
- Transport orders to drop-off spots
- Hand out orders to members at drop-off site.
- work on website; such as: adjust cheese prices for your drop-off, edit market page, upload photos, add recipes, etc.
And other areas. Whether you have an hour a month, or a couple of hours a week, there are so many ways that we could use your unique talents to benefit local farms, artisans, and families. Upstate Locally Grown is made for folks like you, who believe in pulling together for the cause of local food and local business.
To volunteer, please email (click here:) Donna at putneyfarm@aol.com

  • In Transition: Remember to draw down your balances to zero, and pay-as-you-go for a time. USLG is on the move, with many good changes ahead of us.

Remember the "R"s; Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Your Egg Cartons With USLG!
Reduce greenhouse gases and save a trip to the recycling can by throwing your CLEAN Putney Farm cardboard or PET egg cartons back in your reusable grocery bag when they have been emptied out, and bring them to drop-off next time. We can reuse these for your future egg purchases. Thanks!

Prayer Request
Please keep Donna and her wonderful husband, Lenard, in your prayers as they struggle through some health issues. We need your support and helping hands to carry us through this rough spot.

HARVEST NEWS @ A GLANCE!
- Recipe section:
Winter vegetable Coleslaw
- Food & Health News:
Make your own bath products, butter, and more!
- Thank you and farewell to Shae Smith, for now.
Welcome back to Anna Schneider
New Grower/Drop-off at Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery, Tuesdays from 4-6

At the end, a complete alphabetical listing of everything that’s available on our market today, all 400-plus products!

Featured and Fresh Products to Look for this Week:
Greens
Fresh Herbs
Baked Goods
Beef
Pork chops
Pork sausage
Scallions
Spinach, lettuce, and beet greens
Broccoli
Rutabaga
and much, much more!

Make Your Own Bath Products
Lotion, soap, lip balm, and more are easy to make with ingredients from your garden and/or Upstate Locally Grown. A great primer from Natural Home & Garden magazine gives you the basics. Perfect for holiday gift giving!

Make Your Own Butter
Adapted from an article in Organic Gardening
Homemade, fresh organic butter can be made in minutes—10, to be exact. All that’s needed is organic cream and an electric mixer.

“It is so simple, but so exquisite,” says Monique Jamet Hooker, professional chef and author in DeSoto, Wisconsin. She grew up on a farm in Brittany, France, and as a child took turns with her sisters working the butter churn. But she’s given up the old-fashioned method in favor of the electric mixer.

And she goes well beyond basic butter-making, too, transforming a humble square of butter into an edible work of art simply by topping it with three fresh sage leaves laid side by side, or by dusting the surface with tiny purple thyme flowers. Monique also creates luscious compound butters made savory or sweet by stirring flavor-boosting herbs, spices, and other ingredients into softened butter.

Godspeed!
Our fearless market helper and phenomenal order-packer, (Kaevonda) Shae Smith is getting ready to move on, as her job schedule has changed, and she will no longer be free to help on Tuesdays,and we are beyond thankful to have had her service with USLG. Shae has gone above and beyond the “call of duty”, and has kept the delivery van rolling on time for some time now. Donna will really miss Shae, and hopes that she will soon be able to come back. Shae will still be very much involved with USLG, only in a different capacity, as one of our market managers, working in the background. It takes a village, you know.

USLG Events & Updates



January Gardening Tips from Waytt Farm
Radishes, carrots, onion, rutabaga, spinach and turnip seeds can all be direct sown in February. Check with us the first of February to see the heirloom and organic varieties available. Transplants of cabbage and lettuce can go in the garden in February too.
Asparagus crowns need to be planted in February and can go in as late as March Recommended varieties for South Carolina are Jersey Giant, Jersey Knight, and Purple Passion. Most Asparagus take 2 to 3 years before they produce so if ordering, make sure you order a crown that is 2 to 3 years old. You really haven’t tasted Asparagus until you have eaten fresh Asparagus. And what a great way to get kids to eat their vegetables. Owen calls them straws and will eat them straight from the garden.

Lawns
No fertilizer yet but this would be an ideal time to take some soil over to the Clemson Extension office for a test to see what you need to add in the spring.
Try your best not to walk on frozen dormant grass to reduce winter damage. Read up now on lawn care so you can be prepared to give it the best care this spring.
I bet you didn’t know that you can reduce the amount of weeds in your lawn if you can keep it as healthy as possible. To do that isn’t easy but if you follow the maintenance schedule for your type of lawn at Clemson Home and Garden you will be doing a lot to keep the weeds out. These maintenance calendars are specific to your type of lawn so be sure you know what type of grass you have first!
If you are wanting to go more organic, don’t follow the directions on herbicide applications. Many homeowners are happy to have a green lawn whether it is mixed with weeds or not. These lawns are sometimes labeled as “Mixed Media Lawns”.

Fruit Trees THIS IS THE MONTH TO ORDER YOUR FRUIT TREES FROM US! Do your research first or come in and talk to us. The best way to research is to Google the type of fruit tree you are interested in followed by HGIC and it will give you links to Clemson Home and Garden Information Center so you can learn the requirements of all the fruit trees and varieties that grow here. Growing fruit requires proper care so review your interest and level of commitment before taking on this adventure.

Pruning
Don’t sheer your shrubs! At this time of year you don’t want to stimulate new growth that will be tender and susceptible to frost damage. You can prune out some branches by hand if needed but no heavy shaping or pruning until late winter, early spring. Ornamental grasses don’t have to be trimmed back yet as long as they haven’t been too damaged by winds. However, if you prefer to cut your grasses back now, it is perfectly fine.

Perennials, Shrubs and Annuals
The general rule of thumb for dividing perennials is to divide spring and summer-blooming in the fall and fall flowering in early spring when the new shoots have emerged. In our mild winters you could still divide now. The most important thing to remember is not to divide plants while they are flowering. Be sure to water before and after dividing. No fertilizing this month except for your annuals like pansies and snapdragons. Dead head the pansies and snaps and fertilize them.
Houseplants
This is the best time of year for houseplants since it looks so barren outdoors and there is so little to do garden wise. Keep the dead leaves pruned off and watch for any spider mites or other pests. Look carefully because they like to nestle under the leaves. We often use a warm wet rag to wipe off any pests. A Q-tip with a little rubbing alcohol will kill young scale and mealybugs. No fertilizer needed this month. Feeding them every two weeks in spring and summer will keep houseplants such as peace lilies and anthuriums blooming and happy. Flush them out with lots of water two to three times a year. Don’t let your houseplants get too dry or stay too wet. We like bringing them to the sink and giving them a long drink and let them drain well. Wipe the dust off of your shiny smooth leaved houseplants and use a small brush to clean the hairy leaves of your African violets.
Vines and Groundcovers
Check the conditions of your vines growing on trellises and see that they are still attached. It is better to wait until the coldest part of winter is over before doing any pruning of your vines and groundcovers. No fertilizing is needed this month.

Sincerely,

Bess and Wyatt Thompson and Katherine Rowe
Wyatt Farms
103 Wyatt Court
On Center Street Just North of Lakeview School
Greenwood, South Carolina 29649
www.wyattfarms.com

864-229-6252
wyattfarms@ymail.com

January Hours
Monday 9:00 am to Noon
Tuesday thru Saturday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally produced foods possible!