The Weblog

This page contains news, event information, and other items added by the market managers. This is where you will find old newsletters, plus info not included in your weekly newsletter, plus the past year’s weekly newsletters. 10 pages at a time are visible. You may choose to go back further at the bottom of this page.
Thank you for your interest.

“Thanks to all who make this possible!!” ~
DM, Greenville SC
“I’m really happy with everything I received. How juicy and tasty
I’m so thankful for reliable growers and market.” ~ MC, Greenville SC

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Harvest News 8/02/13


*-

To Contact Us

TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
*Clemson Locally Grown *“Upstate Locally Grown”: http://upstatesc.locallygrown.net/admin Greenwood Locally Grown Here "Putney Farm AND FRIENDS Here
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

Recipes

Pickled Hot Pepper Salsa

1 1/2 cups chopped heirloom tomatoes
1/4 cup chopped hot peppers, such as jalapeños, with seeds
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 small onion, minced
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Sea salt

Combine all ingredients and season with salt. Stir well. Let stand for 30 minutes at room temperature to allow flavors to meld before serving. Yields 4 servings. Adapted from: http://www.grit.com/departments/easy-salsa-recipe-zmcz13jazgou.aspx
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Homemade Tzatziki Sauce Recipe
This simple sauce is traditionally paired with Mediterranean pita sandwiches filled with gyro meat or falafel. It’s also delicious as a dip for toasted bread or raw vegetables. Try it on grilled lamb burgers, too. Makes about 2 ½ cups.

Ingredients:

1 medium cucumber, seeded and diced or grated 1 tsp. kosher salt 4 garlic cloves 2 tsp. fresh dill 2 tsp. fresh mint Juice of half a lemon 2 cups strained yogurt (see “How to Make Greek Yogurt,” at right) Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions:

Place the cucumber in a strainer set over a bowl to catch dripping water. Sprinkle salt over the cucumber and let drain for half an hour. Finely chop the garlic and herbs or crush them in a mortar and pestle. Stir the herb mixture, cu­cumbers and lemon juice into the yogurt. Season with more salt and pepper, to taste. Serve chilled.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/tzataiki-sauce-recipe-zb0z1302zmcc.aspx#ixzz2arCGK4Hn

Market News

WELCOME Locally Grown Members.
*YOU AND I ARE THE “US” IN USLG ~ WE CAN DO THIS TOGETHER.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup
Tuesday from 5-6 PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market, Putney Farm Booth, Thursday after 6 or Friday at Swamp Rabbit Café, and
Thursday 6-8PM or Friday 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
Any member from any of our Upstate Locally Grown sister sites may choose any drop-off any time, from the drop-down list of sites at check out. This will not affect your “Default” drop off site.
Email
Donna
Or text: 864-353-6096
WHAT’S COMING UP IN THE GARDENS?
This week, we have concentrated mainly on recipes for the herbs and veggies that are in season now, and have hooked up with a few recipes for sauces made with this week’s offering. Hope you will try some of these and add some different tastes to your diet. Give them a try; I know you will like them!
OCCASIONAL CSA: Every week we offer a grab-bag Occasional CSA for those of you who would like to share the bounty of our farms without formally committing to a CSA. What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: peppers, sweet and hot, heirloom tomatoes, freshly dug white potatoes, vegetable soup, eggs, herbs, with recipes for making life easy and healthier using _locally grown _foods on your dinner table. This will be over $35.00 value and really, priceless, as you will receive the freshest, healthiest produce available anywhere, harvested for you just hours before you pick it up!

Potato Salad
Here is a basic recipe for old fashioned potato salad: Mine uses much more eggs than this, but, what do you expect from an egg producer?
Old Fashioned Potato Salad
5 potatoes
3 eggs
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup sweet relish
1/4 tsp. garlic salt
1/4 tsp. celery salt
1 Tbs. prepared mustard
Ground black pepper to taste
1/4 cup Mayonnaise
Directions
1.Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add potatoes and cook until tender but still firm, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool, peel and chop.
2.Place eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil; cover, remove from heat, and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool, peel and chop.
3.In a large bowl, combine the potatoes, eggs, celery, onion, relish, garlic salt, celery salt, mustard, pepper and mayonnaise. Mix together well and refrigerate until chilled.
Donna’s note:
Have you ever tried the potato salad hot or warm, right after it is made? Once we tried it that way, we always prefer our potato salad hot! I also add a capful or two of Apple cider vinegar. It perks up the flavors. To add health and taste boosts, I add lots of celery seed, chia seed, turmeric, and dill. I like to add the seasonings while the potatoes and eggs are still warm. They seem to absorb the flavor that way.

Want to grow some potatoes of your own? It is just about time to plant the fall crop, and Putney Farm has seed potatoes for you to order. Try them, they are fun!


Lenard Putney digging fresh new potatoes for you!

Perrilla Recipe


STUFFED CUCUMBERS
Ingredients
1 European cucumber (seedless, chilled peeled)
1/2 cup feta cheese (crumbled)
2 tbsps. mayonnaise
8 drops Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp. parsley (minced)
Directions:
1Cut the cucumber in half lengthwise and with a teaspoon scrape out the centers containing the seeds.
2 In a small bowl, blend the feta, mayonnaise and Worcestershire sauce into a smooth mixture. Fill the centers of cucumbers with the cheese mixture. Sprinkle the cucumbers with parsley and chill them for at least 20 minutes. Before serving, slice the cucumbers crosswise into bite-sized pieces.
Suggestions: instead of parsley, try sprinkling celery seed or paprika on some of the cukes after stuffing.
You cam order many of these products frehs on Upstate Locally Grown: www.locallugrown,net or Clemson.locallygrown.net or putneyfarm.locallygrown.net on their market page.

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

ORDERING IS OPEN / HARVEST NEWS


-

To Contact Us

TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
*Clemson Locally Grown *“Upstate Locally Grown”: http://upstatesc.locallygrown.net/admin Greenwood Locally Grown Here "Putney Farm AND FRIENDS Here
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

Recipes

Nasturtium Recipes
The “How-To”
Flowers and leaf are excellent addition to any salad and make a beautiful garnish on your plates. Nasturtium and other cresses are considered interchangeable in the kitchen and are popular in Europe and North America where they are used for spreads (especially those based on cottage cheese) and salads. In Europe, cress leaves are not commonly combined with other fresh herbs but they are compatible with the fines herbes of French cuisine and may be used together with each of them. Leaves or flowers of nasturtium are commonly used to flavour herbal vinegar and cress is also very good for herb sauces.
NASTURTIUM BUTTER:
4 ounces unsalted butter (1/4 pound – 1 stick), softened
12-18 nasturtium flowers – rinsed and drained – chopped small
3-4 fresh chives (optional) – chopped small
2-4 fresh nasturtium leaves or a few sprigs fresh parsley – chopped small
Instructions:
Mix all ingredients until well blended. They can be rolled into logs and wrapped in plastic wrap. Can be frozen. Put a frozen pat/slice on roasted chicken, a freshly grilled steak, baked potato, etc.

NASTURTIUM GOAT OR CREAM CHEESE DIP / SPREAD
8 ounces (1/2 pound) cream cheese or soft goat cheese (chevre)
4 teaspoons tender nasturtium leaves, chopped
4-6 nasturtium flowers for garnish – or can be chopped and mixed in if you wish.
Mix all ingredients until well-blended. We serve the Chevre and Nasturtium Leaves Dip/Spread with crackers. If you desire a creamier consistency, add a add a little bit of milk, cream or sour cream.

little bit of milk, cream or sour cream.

NASTURTIUM PESTO

Ingredients:
?
2 cups nasturtium leaves?
1/2 cup thinly sliced nasturtium stems?
1/2 cup toasted pine nuts?
4 cloves garlic?
1 cup olive oil?
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Directions

1.?
Step 1

Bring a large pot of water to a boil; prepare an ice-water bath and set aside. Add nasturtium leaves to boiling water; cook for 10 seconds. Drain and transfer to ice-water bath until cool. Drain and set aside.

?Step 2

Place leaves, pine nuts, garlic, and oil in the jar of a blender; blend until smooth. Transfer mixture to a medium bowl and fold in stems and cheese.

Basil & Nasturtium Summer Salad
Ingredients
1 cup basil leaves
1 cup nasturtium (leaves)
7 cups salad greens (baby)
1/2 tsp. kosher salt
4 plums (ripe, seeded, and quartered)
1/2 cup toasted pecans
12 nasturtium (blossoms)
1/3 cup plus 2 TBS vinaigrette (Lemon)
Directions:
Place basil, nasturtium leaves, and salad greens in a large bowl. Sprinkle salt over salad mix. Pour 1/3 cup vinaigrette over salad, gently tossing.
2. Divide salad between 4 salad plates, top with plum quarters and pecans. Drizzle remaining vinaigrette over salads. Top each plate with 3 nasturtium blossoms.

Market News

WELCOME Locally Grown Members.
*YOU AND I ARE THE “US” IN USLG ~ WE CAN DO THIS TOGETHER.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup
Tuesday from 5-6 PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market, Putney Farm Booth, Thursday after 6 or Friday at Swamp Rabbit Café, and
Thursday 6-8PM or Friday 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
Any member from any of our Upstate Locally Grown sister sites may choose any drop-off any time, from the drop-down list of sites at check out. This will not affect your “Default” drop off site.
Email
Donna
Or text: 864-353-6096
Veggies are coming in very well now, and growing like gang-busters due to all this rain!
This week, we have concentrated mainly on recipes for the herbs and veggies that are in season now. Hope you will try some of these and add some different tastes to your diet. Give them a try; I know you will like them!
OCCASIONAL CSA: Every week we offer a grab-bag Occasional CSa for those of you who would like to share the bounty of our farms without formally committing to a CSA. What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: Expect to see seasonal veggies (like mixed squashes, potatoes, TOMATOES, peppers, and herbs) and proteins, with recipes for making life easy and healthier using _locally grown _foods on your dinner table





Nasturtium, one of our Edible Flowers

What’s new this week? , tomatoes The nasturtiums, are looking might pretty in yellow, orange, or red, so get some to add a peppery interest to your tossed salads. What?….You say you have never tried Nasturtiums? What are you waiting for? Just a few flowers or leaves added to a tossed salad add the gourmet touch and pretty colors too! Even the seeds are edible, when they are ripe, and some people use them as a capers substitute. (See recipes to the left)
Perilla are doing well, and we sure would love to share this wonderful basil relative with you. See recipes below
*WE HAVE POTATOES! Lots and lots of freshly dug potatoes! Want to grow some of your own? It is just about time to plant the fall crop, and Putney Farm has seed potatoes for you to order. Try them, they are fun!



Remember that “new Potatoes” are freshly dug potatoes which have not been “cured”, or allowed for the skin to dry and toughen up for storage. These will not store for months like the ones in the store, but you won’t have to worry about that, because you will be eating every morsel and craving more! The skin is very thin, so, no peeling needed. If you want to remove the skin anyway (why?) just scrub them with a brush or scrubbie. Many of the mineral nutrients are concentrated in the skin, though, so, think about leaving skin on. With these potatoes, there is no worry, as they were grown in organic soil with nothing but compost added to the growing environment.

Herb-Roasted Oven Fries

Freshly dug potatoes have so much going for them in terms of taste and texture, it’s never easy to pinpoint only one attribute, but I especially like how beautifully they roast. they are so moist that after a short time in the oven, they are just perfect. I cut the potatoes into slices rather than wedges so that more of the surface comes into contact with the hot pan and the final result is crisp perfection. Be sure the pan is hot when adding the potatoes so that they sear immediately. I weave herb stems among the potatoes for optimal flavor and to reduce the labor (no pulling leaves from the stems or chopping).

Ingredients
6 medium-large Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into ½ inch thick slices
grapeseed or coconut oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper
6-8 fresh rosemary sprigs 3 inches long
6 fresh sage sprigs, each with 3 to 5 leaves
1 small yellow onion, finely diced

Procedure
1. Put a large cast-iron skillet (or any other large oven proof pan you have) in the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees

2. In a large bowl, lightly mist the potatoes with oil (or gently rub the potatoes with oil to coat), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and toss to mix. 3 Meanwhile, lightly spray (or put the oil on your hands and gently coat the herbs by rubbing) the rosemary and sage sprigs with oil and set aside. 4. Remove the hot skillet from the oven and lay the potatoes in the skillet, arranging them in as close to a single layer as possible. Roast for about 15 minutes, or until the potatoes are browned on one side. 5. Turn the potatoes over and sprinkle evenly with the onion. “Weave” the rosemary and sage sprigs between the potatoes and return the skillet to the oven. Cook, turning the potatoes and herbs occasionally, for about 15 minutes longer, or until the potatoes are browned and cooked through. 6. Season the potatoes to taste with salt and pepper. Stack the potato slices, with the herbs between them, on a warmed platter and serve. Serves 4. From Homegrown Pure and Simple, by Michel Nischan.

.

Perrilla Recipe

PERILLA
(Beefsteak Plant, Shisho, Chinese Basil)
Perilla leaves can be used in both raw and cooked applications. Extremely popular in Korean cuisine the leaves are commonly used as a wrap for rice, barbecued meats and vegetables. They are also popularly used in Korea to make a kimchee of sorts by marinating the leaves for an extended period with soy sauce, herbs and spices. Add to salads or slice and incorporate into savory pancakes, breads and stir fries. Try using as a substitute for basil in caprice salad or pesto sauce. The flavor of perilla leaves pairs well with chili, garlic, soy sauce, grilled meats and soft cheeses.

Perilla Pesto

½ C. pine nuts (or pecans or walnuts)
3 cloves garlic
½ C. extra-virgin olive oil
1 t. kosher salt
¼ t. white pepper
2 C. perilla leaves
1 T. fresh lemon juice
zest of one lemon

Wash, dry, and roughly chop the perilla leaves.

If you have raw pine nuts, lightly toast them in a dry skillet on medium heat for no more than five minutes. (If you follow a raw food diet, omit this step.) Mine came dry-toasted from Trader Joe’s.

Place all the ingredients in a blender or food processor. Blend until it makes a fine paste. Taste and adjust seasonings.

Serving suggestions: Over pasta, fish, or chicken, or as a dip for vegetables
- See more at: http://reciperenovator.com/special-diets/vegan/healthy-recipes-gluten-free-perilla-pesto/#sthash.6X7Ck4Ra.dpuf

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

Change in Drop-off Day!


Hello Folks!
Well we are finally seeing some sunshine, and loving it! Here’s hoping that our crops can recover, as many farmers have declared theirs a loss. The continuous rain has been too much of a good thing, setting up conditions for crop failure. Fortunately, though, we still have some great fresh veggies at Putney Farm and Friends, so, if you wish to partake, please note:

Greenville Drop-off days are a changing! *
In order to better service our Greenville drop-offs, we will be offering a * late Thursday or any time Friday pick up at both Whole Foods Market and at Swamp Rabbit Café.

Let us know how this works for you.
You may also pick up at the Anderson County Farmer’s market building where we have a booth with the Anderson Area Farm and Food Association’s Farmer’s Market on Tuesday from 5-7:30 PM through the month of August.
More news and availability list to follow; we just wanted to open the markets for you while we are composing a news-and-recipe filled Harvest News for later on.
Donna

Harvest News and Market is Open


-

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR *Clemson Locally Grown *ACCOUNT STATUS And for Upstate Locally Grown; HERE Greenwood Locally Grown Here and Putney Farm Here
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

Recipes

(Putney Farm Grown Squash Above)

Patty Pan Squash Ideas
Patty pans go by many names. Depending on where you’re from, you might call them sunburst squash, scallop squash, button squash, or white squash. I call them patty pans. It’s much more fun that way.
Mix with other squash, sauté or steam with a little onion and a dash of seasoning mix, and you have an excellent side dish.
Or, try this quick and simple recipe from Food Renegade.com
•5 or 6 medium patty pan squash, sliced
•1/4 C melted butter or ghee
•1 bunch fresh basil, chopped
•sea salt

The “How-To”

Begin by preheating your oven to 350F degrees and prepping the veggies — cutting your patty pan squash into 1/4 inch slices and chopping your fresh basil.
Layer the patty pan slices at the bottom of a 2 quart baking dish and lightly drizzle with melted butter or ghee.
Scatter some freshly cut basil on top and lightly sprinkle with sea salt. Continue forming these layers of patty pan squash, butter/ghee, basil, and salt until you’ve used all your squash and basil. Cover the dish and bake it in the 350F degree oven for 30 minutes, or until the squash is tender. Remove from the oven and serve as a delectable side. ENJOY!

Market News

WELCOME Locally Grown Members.
*YOU AND I ARE THE “US” IN USLG ~ WE CAN DO THIS TOGETHER.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 5-6 PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market, Putney Farm Booth, Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Tuesday 4-8PM or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
NEW DROP-OFF ARRANGEMENTS BEGAN IN JUNE: Beginning on June 4, Putney Farm/ Upstate Locally Grown Market will have a farmer’s Market booth on Tuesday from 5-8PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market.
Where: Anderson Farmer’s Market
When: 5-8 PM on Tuesdays. This will go through the month of August. Any member from any of our Upstate Locally Grown sister sites may choose this drop-off any time, from the drop-down list of sites at check out. This will not affect your “Default” drop off site.
What: Farmer’s Market Booth and Upstate Locally Grown pick-up opportunity. Many of your favorite growers will be there with their fresh veggies and fruit. This will be an opportunity to pick up extras that aren’t (yet) offered on USLG. Just choose the Anderson Drop-off and we will have your orders ready for you there. Email
Donna
Or text: 864-353-6096
Veggies are coming in very well now, and growing like gang-busters due to all this rain!
OCCASIONAL CSA: What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: Expect to see seasonal veggies (like mixed squashes, potatoes, GREEN TOMATOES WITH RECIPE and herbs) and proteins, with recipes for making life easy and healthier using _locally grown _foods on your dinner table





Nasturtium, one of our Edible Flowers

What’s new this week? Squashes are looking buff! Zucchini, Patty-Pan (recipe on left), summer squashes crooked and straight neck, tomatoes) not many ripe, but plenty of large green ones! The nasturtiums, are looking might pretty in yellow, orange, or red, so get some to add a peppery interest to your tossed salads. What?….You say you have never tried Nasturtiums? What are you waiting for? Just a few flowers or leaves added to a tossed salad add the gourmet touch and pretty colors too! Even the seeds are edible, when they are ripe, and some people use them as a capers substitute.
WE HAVE POTATOES!



Our first picking of Yukon Gold potatoes was a wonderful surprise! We had no idea what was going on underground till a couple of rogue hens scratching in the straw scratched up a couple of huge taters to show us what was growing on right under our noses! So, Lenard and I began to feel around under there and found some beautiful new potatoes for you! They are crispy and buttery and melt in your mouth! Be sure to order some this week, and make a note of whether you want large or small ones. Besides Yukon Golds, we have some fine white fleshed potatoes. Remember that “new Potatoes” are freshly dug potatoes which have not been “cured”, or allowed for the skin to dry and toughen up for storage. These will not store for months like the ones in the store, but you won’t have to worry about that, because you will be eating every morsel and craving more! The skin is very thin, so, no peeling needed. If you want to remove it anyway (why?) just scrub them with a brush or scrubbie. Many of the mineral nutrients are concentrated in the skin, though, so, think about leaving skin on. With these potatoes, there is no worry in leaving skin on, as they were grown in organic soil with nothing but compost added to the growing environment.

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GUEST BLOGGER JESS BAYNE: 30 Days on the Plate


The words below, written by friend, Jess, just so happen to reflect the opinion of your market manager, who wishes she could have expressed them as well as Jess has here.

“Who Cares? We are all going to die anyway.”Eat Real Food.

I feel like I can’t stop talking about food – Everywhere with everyone all the time. I think I’m becoming borderline obnoxious (possibly full on obnoxious to some). But food has become a central focus at my house. It rearranged the budget, the pantry, the medicine cabinet, the fridge, the shopping, the conversations – everything. I guess it is not really food necessarily, but the anti-food – The Chemicals.
Before I go any further, I want to address a statement that keeps getting tossed at me: “_Who cares? We are all going to die anyway.”_ Yep, that is correct; we are all going to die someday. So? So, what? Does that mean we should get about 35 decent years, and then start falling apart for the next 15 -20 years until we are just sitting or lying around waiting to die? That is crazy. Seriously, that is what we’ve come to? What if we could have 70 decent years?* How much more life could we live if we take it by the horns Now instead of saying, essentially, life isn’t worth the hassle? Instead of trading in the last quarter of our lives for doctors’ offices and pills and treatments just to keep from dying, Take. It. Back. _Take it back from the part of the world so driven by money and power that they are trading our lives for profit. _
Take back your health. Take back your freedom to choose what you put into and on your body.
Saying it like that makes it sound so profound – so Big. But it is not. It is opening up to the possibility that what you’ve been raised on, been taught, is wrong. I am not trying to dishonor our parents or grandparents here. They were duped, too and in the worst way. They were duped when life was hard. They needed some things to get easier. They needed life to be good again. What began as a good idea started a pendulum in motion that is now killing them. Like in Poe’s terrifying account of the captive forced to choose which way to die, we are forced to pick our poison. Which way to die – Cancer? Heart Disease? Diabetes? We are the prisoners tied to the floor with the pendulum ever coming down on us – we see it coming. And we are surrounded by putrid water, and rats, and fiery walls. Is there an army coming to save us? I don’t think so. In the words of the Hopi Elders, We are the ones We have been waiting for.
(Second installment next week)
…….
Here are some excerpts: just to “tease” you:
“Untraining ourselves is overwhelming at first. If you take it head on and get serious about it (not dabbling around cause it is trendy or any of that crap), it is unhinging. Finding out what we are doing to ourselves and our children – it is like mourning the loss of a loved one.”
“We are the ones we have been waiting for. Not the doctors. Not the politicians. Not the diet gurus. Not the food manufacturers. Us. We. You. I. Heal yourself.”
To follow Jess’ Blog, “The Baynes in motion”
(Who said it would be Easy? What is the BIG deal when you’ve done something easy?)" and to read past posts as well, click here

  • The Putneys, approaching 70 themselves, and both very physically active, believe that there is abundant life after 70, too.
    30 Days on the Plate.(
    a closed Face Book group that I would love to add you to if you are interested)

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

Your Market is Open


Hello folks! Your market is open for ordering, and your drop-off choices are

  • Tuesday July 2 : Whole Foods Market Greenville SC, 4 PM till Wednesday at Closing. Anderson Farmer’s Market from 5-8 PM Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery from 4:30-6
  • Wednesday: You may pick up at Whole Foods all day at the information desk.
  • Any questions or problems: text me : 864-353-6096

We now have heirloom green tomatoes for your dining pleasure. We will provide two recipes with your tomato order this week: one for Southern fried green tomatoes, and one for Green tomatoes over pasta.
Our wildflowers are blooming their little heads off, so why not order a wildflower bouquet to delight yourself or a loved one with the fragrance of wildflowers and herbs. And, if you have someone who has a special occasion coming up, order up one of these delightful bouquets to add to the pleasure of their day?
We are happily involved in a project called “Trusted Farms”, which supplies CSA’s to people’s workplaces. Since this is our first year, we elected to partner with Welch and Son Farm to create a delectable array of CSA products for the project. Yesterday was our first day, and it was a thrill to see how excited the people were about their CSA bags, (and their wildflower bouquets were really a hit!) I figure that it could be the very first time that some of these folks have ever tasted sustainably raised foods, and their taste buds will never be the same. It is very encouraging to me to know that more and more folks are waking up to the idea that food is the building block of health, and that what you eat can and will make a difference in our general well-being. Please continue to spread the word, dear friends, and set examples for others to follow!
Chicken is in! We are now replenished with Welch and son whole Chickens; just in time for your week-end celebrations! Order one or more; stock up so you aren’t caught short again. Remember, folks, that these free-ranged chickens are NOT commercial chickens. What’s the difference, you ask? Glad you asked. Commercial chickens are a different breed; bred for (dangerous) rapid growth and huge breasts. They are usually raised by the thousands either in pens that allow no movement, or on floors of huge buildings where they are jammed together and can hardly move. They get no fresh air nor sunshine, either. You see, an advantage to the companies that raise hens this way is that the poultry can’t exercise and can’t really build muscle, therefore, they are more tender.
This is our point here: Free-ranged chickens are free to exercise and therefore, they build muscle along with gathering good enzymes form the soil they peck. They are simply more healthy, and require no antibiotics. They graze on green things and on their natural diet: insects. (They are birds, you know) :-) They bask in the sun when they feel like it and get plenty of sunshine vitamin D. Pastured chickens are just plain better for you all the way around!
One point that we would like to make here though, is that these are not fryers. The young chickens are better appreciated as broilers. Baked, boiled in a broth, or in a crock pot; in other words, slow cooking with a little moisture is the very best way to enjoy these tasty birds! Add a little onion, garlic, and rosemary, and you have a meat fit for a king! Oh, can’t you just imagine the wonderful smell of a chicken baking in the oven or crock pot with a few new potatoes and onions scattered around them basting in the juices? I’m making myself hungry, so order some chickens today before I eat all of them, Ha, Ha!
For all you beef lovers: there is nothing more tasty, in my opinion, than Nature’s Beef from Taylor Farm! Since the Taylors are so convenient to us as our neighbors, we eat their beef consistently. We have always had the most wonderful meals with Nature’s Beef; no matter what cuts we have tried! One way that we love the beef, now that we have discovered it, is in the thin slices called “Philly”. We love to not only use it for Philly style sandwiches with onion and peppers on them, but we use this cut in stir fry, for hot beef sandwiches, and a myriad of ways! (Of course we love all the cuts!) Roasts are tender, steaks are tasty, ground beef is always just right, and very little fat, but still tasty!
Announcing that AWA Approved Happy Critters will be joining us for the months of July and August right here on the USLG sites! Order now while you can!
Remember that we have more and more veggies as the weather warms up! Look under the heading of Produce/Vegetables.
Hope to see you some time along the way. Come visit our booth at the evening market at Anderson Farmer’s Market. Some of your old friends are there, too, such as Hurricane Creek Farm (Only a week or two left for his tomatoes) Split Creek Farm, And Happy Critters Farm are all there every Tuesday from 5-8 PM. Make plans to come see us this week before your holidays start.
Best to you!
Donna and Lenard Putney

Last minute ordering is still open


Morning, folks!~
We have lots of fresh sustainable produce ready in the fields and gardens and plenty of protein for you, too. It is not too late to order if you do so before noon Monday; drop-off schedule for all is below. Here are the links to the Markets: Greenwood, Clemson/Anderson, and Greater Greenville.
Drop-off Tuesday in Anderson at the Anderson Farmer’s Market, Downtown Anderson 5-7, in Greenville at Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery 4-6, Wednesday 1-2 PM Tractor Supply Parking lot Greenwood, and Wednesday 8-8 at Whole foods Market service desk. Please remember to watch for your confirmation email after you order so that you know your order went through. If you don’t get your confirmation, your products are still in your cart, where we can’t see them. To make your deposit, hit the “Donate” Pay Pal link anywhere on the web page and use check or any major debit or credit card. or click the link below.

If you need help, please message me 864-353-6096 or email this link.
Donna

Last Chance to Order for This Week's Pick Up


Hello Folks! Just a little reminder that ordering is about to close for this week on the Upstate Locally Grown Network: clemson.locallygrown.net UpstateSC.localygrown.net and Greenwood.locallygrown.net. Remember that you may choose to pick up at the Anderson Farmer’s Market where Putney Farm and others of your favorite growers will be joining other AAFFA members for a great sustainable market fron 5-8 on Tuesday. Clemson folks will be picking up there from now through August, and All of the Upstate may choose that pick up by just making a note on your order. Mrs Spurgeon is baking pies today, and is getting the ingredients together now, so, hurry, get your orders in quickly.
Hope to see you soon!
Donna and Lenard Putney.

Helpful hints and A Reminder of our Policies


Welcome to Upstate Locally Grown Market, where you may enjoy a delectable array of locally and sustainably produced choices.
Feel free to browse anytime.
Ordering:

  • The market will be open for ordering from Thursday at 6pm until Monday 12pm.
  • Go to the Market page and browse fresh, sustainable local items directly from the grower.
  • When you are finished ordering, Proceed to check-out, where you may make notes under each item to specify your wishes. ie: “I would like a serving for four”….or “The smallest piece you have, please”… or, “Please phone me with the final price of my meat” etc.
    *Please be free with your comments and questions in the comment section at ordering. We will read it and take care of your questions. We want to make getting your locally grown products easy for you!
  • Upon completing your order, you will receive an automatic e-mail with your order totals. *IMPORTANT: If you do not receive a confirmation email with your order on it, then your order did not go through.. and your products would still be in your shopping cart, where we cannot see them.
    If this is the case, try again, or email upstatesc@locallygrown.net for instructions.
    *Payment is convenient. Simply click on the PayPal Donate Button anywhere you see it on the site after you receive your confirmation totals. You may deposit any amount and draw down, or deposit the exact amount; it is up to you. These credits are to be used for products or membership only, as we are not able to refund your credits in cash. Remember that the meat and cheese orders will be adjusted to the actual weight of each piece after you order, so please allow for this.
    Spending credits: When you deposit to PayPal, we will post the credits to your USLG account. The software does the math and will credit and subtract when you order. These funds are not refundable in cash.
    You must spend all of your funds before becoming inactive, or else donate it to Upstate Locally Grown operating funds, as it is not refundable in cash.
    We hope that you enjoy being a part of the Upstate Locally Grown family.
    We also hope that you will want to become part of the cooperative effort between farmer and consumer that we have created here. If you would like to learn about volunteer opportunities, please respond to this email, or send me a note at upstatesc@locallygrown.net

Your Market Manager
Donna Putney
864-353-6096 text
upstatesc@locallygrown.net

6/6/13 Market Harvest News! Market is open for ordering!


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Recipes

Kohlrabi
According to the “Huffington Post article”:, it’s easy to see how kohlrabi could throw you off your game the first time you see it. It looks like someone teleported a vegetable from Mars right into your kitchen. But in truth, kohlrabi is incredibly versatile. Kohlrabi, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and kale are all cousins, so you can expect that any flavor that goes nicely with one, will be lovely with the other.

After asking a formerly vegetarian friend what she likes to do with kohlrabi best, she said, “Honestly, just peel it, slice it, sprinkle it with salt and eat it raw.” We love her style and hope you follow suit. You can basically treat kohlrabi, both the green and purple varieties, like a sweet, overgrown radish. Do be sure to remove all of the peel (which is really tough), unless you plan to cook it until it’s soft.
www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/15/kohlrabi-recipes_n_1597114.html?
“Kohlrabi is a vegetable that reminds me of a potato crossed with an artichoke heart. I roast it with garlic and Parmesan cheese.” — WSBLEND

  • ROASTED KOHLRABI*
    Serves Three to Four
    (received 4.5 stars out of 5 in 77 ratings)
    INGREDIENTS
    4 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 clove garlic, minced
    salt and pepper to taste
    1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions
1.Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
2.Cut the kohlrabi into 1/4 inch thick slices, then cut each of the slices in half. Combine olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Toss kohlrabi slices in the olive oil mixture to coat. Spread kohlrabi in a single layer on a baking sheet.
3.Bake in the preheated oven until browned, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally in order to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Return to the oven to allow the Parmesan cheese to brown, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately.
Adapted from Allrecipes.com

Market News

WELCOME Upstate Locally Grown Members.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 5-6 PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market, Putney Frm Booth, Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Tuesday 4-8PM or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
NEW DROP-OFF ARRANGEMENTS BEGIN IN JUNE: Beginning on June 4, Putney Farm/ Upstate Locally Grown Market will have a farmer’s Market booth on Tuesday from 5-8PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market.
Where: Anderson Farmer’s Market
When: 5-8 PM on Tuesdays.
What: Farmer’s Market Booth and CLG pick-up opportunity. Many of your favorite growers will be there with their fresh veggies and fruit. This will be an opportunity to pick up extras that aren’t (yet) offered on USLG. Just choose the Anderson Drop-off and we will have your orders ready for you there.
Donna

What happened Last week, you say? Some of you may have wondered why the markets didn’t open last week. Well, The Putneys have both been ill lately, with Lenard having been in the hospital. We have been suffering from a bacterial infection and we believe we have found the source in our water lines, so are thinking that we will quickly recover. We plan to go full speed this week.


What’s new this week? Green onions *are looking good! So are the *nasturtiums, so get some to add a peppery interest to your tossed salads. Kohlrabi is at its finest. You can use it fresh in salads and slaws, or try our recipe to the left. Strawberries and lettuces are on the way out, but there are still plenty of greens for your dining pleasure. Summer squash is coming along, and tomatoes are putting on some steam. *WE HAVE POTATOES! * Our first picking of Yukon Gold potatoes was a wonderful surprise! We had no idea what was going on underground till a couple of rogue hens scratching in the straw scratched up a couple of huge taters! So, Lenard and I began to feel around under there and found some beautiful new potatoes for you! They are crispy and buttery and melt in your mouth! Be sure to order some this week, and make a note of whether you want large or small ones.

OCCASIONAL CSA:(NEW) What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: an array of lettuces from Putney Farm, with Amaranth and Lamb’s quarters, spring onion, an herb sampler, and edible flowers to garnish a freshly harvested garden green and herb salad. ( Suggestion: A simple vinaigrette of extra-virgin olive oil, herb, balsamic or wine vinegar, salt and pepper is best to allow the other flavors of the herbs, greens and flowers to shine through.)
The featured eggs will be Jumbo Fresh Duck Eggs. These jumbo eggs are wonderful for baking, because they add fluff to cakes, pancakes, etc. Besides baking, the rich flavor and texture also lend a boost to an _egg salad _or potato salad, and we love them as boiled, fried, or scrambled eggs. Your CSA bag will be rounded off with a cheese, and a protein. Order early while quantities last.

COMING EVENTS


SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
lET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD:
The Greenville March against Monsanto was a great success, as was the get-together afterward at Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery. We have formed some great friendships and made some strong and healthy alliances with this group of concerned citizens, which will positively affect the future of Upstate Locally Grown and help us to grow in the direction we are looking for. You will hear more about this in coming newsletters, but I can tell you that it will be all good news!
Facebook Page here Website: Here. What’s it all about?The March against Monsanto world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here
Basically, our local group is concerned about 1)unwanted GMO’s showing up in our foods without giving us a choice whether we want these or not. 2)There is no law about labeling, so we want labeling to be mandatory. 3)We also are concerned with the loss of the bee and pollinators due to use of systemic pesticides that remain in the plant and its pollen. 4) Educating folks about these issues and more environmental concerns is a major part of our mission, and USLH plans to be a part in this education. If you follow us on Facebook, you already know that we are generating lots of links to sources of studies and other info to keep us in the know on these issues. Please “follow us (Upstate Locally Grown)”: https://www.facebook.com/upstatelocallygrown?ref=hl if you would like to know more.

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.

May 23 USG Harvest News


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Recipes

Strawberries and Mangos with Mint Sugar
adapted from Fine Cooking Magazine

Serves Three to Four

ingredients:
2 TBS granulated sugar (or Stevia)
4-6 fresh mint leaves *
1 pint Strawberries,* hulled and sliced
1 Mango, peeled, seeded, and diced (or)
1 Kiwi, peeled, sliced, and diced.

Yogurt for serving (Optional)
Instructions:
Process the sugar and mint leaves in a coffee grinder ( or pound the mint and half the sugar in a mortar until finely ground, stir in the remaining sugar) In a medium sized bowl, toss the strawberries and mango (or kiwi) cubes with the mint sugar. Let the fruit sit for 5-10 minutes to dissolve the sugar. Serve topped with a dollop of yogurt, if you like.

Market News

WELCOME Upstate Locally Grown Members.

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4:30-5:15 PM at Clemson Montessori School., Tuesday 4-6 at Swamp Rabbit Café, and Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market, Greenville.
*NEW DROP-OFF ARRANGEMENTS BEGIN IN JUNE:
Beginning on June 4, Putney Farm/ Upstate Locally Grown Market will have a farmer’s Market booth on Tuesday from 5-8PM at Anderson Farmer’s Market.
Where: Anderson Farmer’s Market
When: 5-8 PM on Tuesdays.
What: Farmer’s Market Booth and CLG pick-up opportunity. Many of your favorite growers will be there with their fresh veggies and fruit. This will be an opportunity to pick up extras that aren’t (yet) offered on USLG. Beginning that week; Just choose the Anderson Drop-off and we will have your orders ready for you there.
Donna

OCCASIONAL CSA:(NEW) What you will see in the occasional CSA this week: an array of baby lettuces from Putney Farm, with a few micro greens of amaranth and Lamb’s quarters, a spring onion, an herb sampler, and edible flowers to garnish a freshly harvested garden green and herb salad. ( Suggestion: A simple vinaigrette of extra-virgin olive oil, herb, balsamic or wine vinegar, salt and pepper is best to allow the other flavors of the herbs, greens and flowers to shine through.)
The featured eggs will be Jumbo Fresh Duck Eggs. These jumbo eggs are wonderful for baking, because they add fluff to cakes, pancakes, etc. Besides baking, the rich flavor and texture also lend a boost to an _egg salad _or potato salad, and we love them as boiled, fried, or scrambled eggs. Your CSA bag will be rounded off with braising greens, a cheese, and a pint of freshly harvested strawberries for dessert. Order early while quantities last.

COMING EVENTS


CFSA Farm tours June 1-2
2013 Upstate Farm Tour – Volunteers Needed! You may wish to volunteer as a greeter at a favorite farm for one day of the tours and get a free LOGO gift, as well as FREE entrance to any/all of the farms on the tour on the day that you aren’t volunteering! Ashley Jordan is the volunteer coordinator for the tours this year! Contact Ashley @ ashleyjordan962@gmail.com You may also reach Ashley at 864-940-0994. Act soon, as the volunteer slots are filling up!

SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
lET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD:

March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25

!
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/files/photo/image/9526/thumb/be_proactive.jpg?1368832777!

These are family-friendly, peaceful marches, with informative speakers. Please feel free to make a sign, and if you do, use no sharp points on the stick. And, wear red if you can. See March against Monsanto on Facebook for lots of great info.
March Against Monsanto ANDERSON takes place Sat. May 25th at 11am at the Anderson County Farmers Market! There will be local businesses and farms, music, speeches, info booths, and hopefully a full scale march. Please come out, spread the word, join something that matters to each of our bodies and the sake of our planet!
*March Against Monsanto Greenville takes place the same day at one o’clock.
Here is copy from the Facebook page: “On May 25, activists around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.
Meet at County Square in Greenville, SC – 1:00 pm. We will march. Wear red. Bring Signs (no bigger than 20X30 with a blunt post – no sharp points). Bring your voice.” Facebook Page here Website: Here. This will be a world-wide event. The Greenville group wishes to keep this peaceful. We just want our voices heard and want labeling so that we know what we are eating. If you would like to join the marches, go to the MAM event page on Facebook and let them know that you will be there. But, you are welcome to join in at any rate.

What’s it all about?The March against Monsanto world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here

You are the US in USLG!


We thank you for joining us in the effort to bring Fresh, Local, Sustainable Food from Farm to Table in the most convenient way possible.